Cold Cranking Amps is the amount of power, in Amps, that the car’s battery is able to supply in order to start the car’s engine. The technical definition of CCA is the maximum amount of Amps that a battery is capable of delivering at an ambient temperature of zero degree Fahrenheit for 30 seconds before the battery is no longer able to supply a usable amount of power. When you start your car, the battery has to supply enough power to the starter to run the motor over with enough speed to start. It must also supply enough power to the ignition system to provide a hot enough spark to make the engine start. Additionally, with newer cars, you will have fuel pumps, injector systems, computers and dash instruments which will all pull power while starting. If your battery is not capable of supplying a large enough current punch when starting, it won’t start the car. Car batteries are designed to supply anywhere from 400 cold cranking amps on the smaller batteries all the way up to over 1,500 for some of the larger and more expensive batteries.